Infographic: Eyes on the Road Hands on the Wheel

Erie Insurance surveyed 1,915 U.S. drivers about the distracted driving behaviors they’ve done and seen. The results found drivers doing all sorts of dangerous things behind the wheel, from taking selfies, to changing clothes and drivers, to styling their hair.

It’s not me, it’s you! When asked which of the following distracted driving behaviors they had engine in or seen other drivers engage in, the results were dramatically different.

Texting: 30% of drivers admit to doing it, 75% of people say they’ve seen other drivers do it.
Smoking: 30% of drivers admit to doing it, 75% of people say they’ve seen other drivers do it.
Singing/dancing: 43% of drivers admit to doing it, 59% of people say they’ve seen other drivers do it.
Applying makeup: 8% of drivers admit to doing it, 66% of people say they’ve seen other drivers do it.
Combing/styling hair: 15% of drivers admit to doing it, 55% of people say they’ve seen other drivers do it.
Reading: 15% of drivers admit to doing it, 52% of people say they’ve seen other drivers do it.
Taking Selfies: 4% of drivers admit to doing it, 23% of people say they’ve seen other drivers do it.

When asked which behaviors they engage in but do not see as distracting, 9% of drivers say they daydream but don’t think it’s distracting. An Erie Insurance analysis of police data found that daydreaming was the biggest cause of fatal car crashes. 28% of drivers say they talk on a cell phone but don’t think it’s distracting.

Texting: 30% say they’ve done it, 75% say they’ve seen other drivers do it. Drivers in the South are most likely to do it at 35% and people in the Northeast are least likely at 24%. Men are more likely than women to text while driving (32% of men vs. 28% of women). When it comes to texting while driving, the older you get, the less you do it. 51% of 18-34 year olds text while driving while 7% of drivers 65 and older text while driving. 4% of drivers say they text while driving, but don’t think it’s distracting.

TMI re: PDA. 15% have had a romantic encounter or engaged in a public display of affection while behind the wheel. Male drivers are nearly 60% more likely than female drivers to have done this (19% of men vs. 12% of women).

Quick change artists. 9% of drivers have changed clothes while driving. 3% have changed drivers – while driving.

Keeping the pearly whites pearly: 4% have brushed or flossed their teeth while driving. Flossing/brushing behind the wheel is most common among the 55-64 year old set at 6% and least common among 45-44 year olds at 2%.

Clear vision: 2% of drivers have put in contact lenses of eye drops while driving.

How does my hair look: 15% of drivers admit to combing/styling their hair while driving.

Ladies, isn’t this hard enough to do while standing: 1% of drivers have curled their eyelashes while driving, all of them women.

Gotta go!: 3% have gone to the bathroom while driving. This is most common among men at 5%. Only 1% of women have done this while driving (or, men are four times more likely than women to do this.)

It happens every day: 9% of drivers have engaged in some type of distracted driving behavior within the past day. 44% have done it within the past month. People in the South are twice as likely to have engaged in distracted driving behaviors with in the past day than people in the Northeast (12% in the South vs. 6% in the Northeast).

My little secret: 42% of drivers admit to engaging in distracted driving behaviors, with 20% saying they never engage in such behaviors when passengers are in the car, but they do when they are alone.

Other distractions: One person reported seeing someone driving and playing a guitar at the same time. Another person reported seeing someone scratching off lottery tickets while driving.

About the survey: The survey was conducted online with in the Unites States by Harris Poll on behalf of Erie Insurance from Feb 23-25, 2015 among 1,915 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Media Relations at media_relations@erieinsurance.com

ERIE recently surveyed hundreds of drivers about their distracted driving behaviors. Learn which ones were the most common--and the most unbelievable. /blog/eyes-on-the-road-hands-on-the-wheel Erie Insurance